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Episode 020: Matt Eversmann – How To Lead Soldiers Into Battle (Black Hawk Down)

Episode 020: Matt Eversmann – How To Lead Soldiers Into Battle (Black Hawk Down)

I was truly honored to speak with an American Hero for this episode of The Learning Leader Show.  Matt Eversmann led soldiers into one of the most dangerous places in the world.  His story was told in the book and movie, “Black Hawk Down.”  His specific character was played by Josh Hartnett.  We discussed the story behind what really happened in Mogadishu…

Matt Eversmann has received many military decorations, including the Army Service Ribbon, the National Defense Service Ribbon, eight Army Achievement medals, and four Army Commendation medals. For his service in Somalia, he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Valor device and the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Before his retirement in early 2008, Eversmann served 18 months in Iraq leading an elite Army Ranger force.

Episode 020: Matt Eversmann – How To Lead Soldiers Into Battle (Black Hawk Down)

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The Learning Leader Show

“Fear is something you have to control.  It’s okay to be scared.”  – Matt Eversmann describing what it’s like to be shot at.

Some Questions I Ask:

  • What are the differences between leading soldiers into battle vs leading in a business setting?
  • What are you feeling as you’re being shot at?
  • What was it like to be portrayed by Josh Hartnett in the movie Black Hawk Down?
  • How could you have handled the adverse situation better?
  • Why do we struggle to implement and execute what we’ve learned?
  • How would you define a learning leader
  • What specific lessons learned from the mission that you took back to Fort Benning?

In This Episode, You Will Learn:

  • Matt’s love of his team and him focusing on the people he fought with
  • How everything for the book and movie Black Hawk Down came about
  • His advice for both the military soldiers making the transition back into the civilian world as well the companies who are going to hire them
  • What it was like speaking with the widow of one of his men he fought with
  • How Black Hawk Down has affected his life

 “The scientist is not the person who gives the right answers; he’s the one who asks the right questions.” – Claude Levi-Strauss

Continue Learning

You may also like these episodes:

Episode 001: How To Become A Master Connector With Jayson Gaignard From MasterMind Talks

Episode 003: The Incredibly Interesting Story Of Maurice Clarett And How He Built A 6 Figure Income After Spending 4 Years In Prison

Episode 002: How To Take Over And Set Bigger Goals With Chris Brogan

Episode 004: How Todd Wagner (and Mark Cuban) Sold Broadcast.com To Yahoo! For $5.7 Billion

Episode 010: Shane Snow – How To Accelerate Success Using Smart Cuts

Did you enjoy the podcast?

I was honored to have this Matt… I learned so much about his process for leadership.  I loved his descriptions for what it’s like when the bullets are flying (literally).  Who do you know that needs to hear this?  Send them to The Learning Leader Show!

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

 

Bio From Keppler Speakers:

First Sergeant Matt Eversmann’s legendary leadership while facing the horrors of war cemented his status as an American military hero. Portrayed by Josh Hartnett, Eversmann was immortalized in the epic film, Black Hawk Down, which recounts the 18 harrowing hours when US soldiers in Somalia were trapped in a hostile district of Mogadishu. Young Rangers and Delta Force soldiers fought side-by-side, outnumbered and marked for death by an angry mob, until a rescue convoy was mounted.  Committed to sharing the lessons he learned in the military, inspirational speaker Matt Eversmann focuses on motivating all people, be they soldiers, students, or employees, through values-based leadership, encouraging them to do their best and dedicate themselves to a cause. His courage and patriotism are unmatched, and his power as a motivational speaker is unrivaled.

Matt Eversmann has received many military decorations, including the Army Service Ribbon, the National Defense Service Ribbon, eight Army Achievement medals, and four Army Commendation medals. For his service in Somalia, he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Valor device and the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Before his retirement in early 2008, Eversmann served 18 months in Iraq leading an elite Army Ranger force.

 

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