AuthorRyan Hawk

Episode 217: JJ Redick – “You’ve Never Arrived. You’re Always Becoming.”

Episode 217: JJ Redick – “You’ve Never Arrived. You’re Always Becoming.”

JJ Redick is an iconic and legendary basketball player from Duke University. He is their all time leading scorer.  JJ was the 11th overall pick in the 2006 NBA draft (Orlando Magic).  He’s going in to his 12th NBA season.  He recently signed a 1 year, $23 million contract with the Philadelphia 76ers.  He graduated from Duke with a major in history and a minor in cultural anthropology. He is an extremely thoughtful leader and someone I loved talking to…

Episode 217: JJ Redick – “You’ve Never Arrived. You’re Always Becoming.”

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“There was never any sense that I was done accomplishing things. You’ve never arrived. You’re always becoming.”

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence:
    • Passion for what they do
      • Coach K has this at Duke, Steve Ballmer has this with Microsoft as well
    • They master the small stuff — Read The Carrot Seed
      • Being in the weeds everyday
      • Diligence to be in the weeds
    • Adaptability
      • Coach K doesn’t have a system. He adapts to his current players. It changes every year. Same is true for Bill Belichick and Greg Popovich
      • “How do I maximize this team’s personnel?”
      • “Each year you have to adapt”
  • The power of receiving a daily devotional
  • “There was never any sense that I was done accomplishing things.”
  • The importance of coaches, parents, and friends to never let JJ feel entitled. They would call him out if needed
    • 2nd half of the ACC championship when he was acting like a brat. Chris Collins called him out
  • How do we develop GRIT in our children if we’re able to provide anything they could ever want?
    • “The biggest thing I learned from my Dad was he went to work everyday. Then he came home and would work on the house, the yard, and work more. He showed me how to work.”
    • Live under your means
    • “Stuff doesn’t matter, we care more about having great experiences as a family”
  • Falling Upward –  “to reach the second half of your journey, you need to fail” — It’s necessary
  • Working in an imperfect environment — “Mastering mechanics in an imperfect environment”
    • “You can’t master it unless you’ve done it over and over and over”
      • “It’s very rare that anyone works in a perfect environment” — You must be able to adapt
  • Mindset going in to free agency? “Wanted stability. Had 15 minutes to decide on the 76ers offer.”
  • Being an “over thinker.”  “Addicted to information” — How does that impact him as a shooter?
    • “I am addicted to information. I am a deep dive person.”
  • How to handle a slump? –“You have to enjoy the mundane. I love going in the gym and shooting over and over.” (Angela Duckworth — GRIT)
  • Goal setting process — Each year, write down a list of what you want to accomplish
    • Some examples: Win an NBA championship, get a sleeve (arm) tattoo, have a son, go on a great European vacation.
      • Setting life goals every year — “How do we include other people on this journey?”
      • A “Words of Wisdom” file on his phone
  • Life after basketball
    • General Manager in front office or creating a media company to tell interesting stories. Building something. Anthony Bourdain is the blueprint. He uses food to tell interesting stories
    • OR the idea of completely reinventing himself. “That idea is both terrifying and exciting at the same time.”
    • “The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.”
  • Building relationships and networks in a variety of places
  • Working with and learning from LeBron James and Maverick Carter

“The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.” 

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 073: Jay Bilas – World Class ESPN Basketball Broadcaster, Toughness, Fixing The NCAA

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Callaway Golf. We have partnered to give away The #1 selling Driver in 2017.  The Callaway GBB Epic Driver.  This club is valued at $499 and we are giving one away to a loyal listener of the show.  To enter the drawing: Tweet (or post on Instagram) a favorite leadership quote from an episode of The Learning Leader Show and tag/@ me on Twitter or Instagram.

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Episode 216: Jim Collins – How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 216: Jim Collins – How To Go From Good To Great

Jim Collins is a student and teacher of leadership and what makes great companies tick. Having invested a quarter century of research into the topic, he has authored or co-authored six books that have sold in total more than ten million copies worldwide. They include: GOOD TO GREAT, the #1 bestseller, which examines why some companies and leaders make the leap to superior results, along with its companion work GOOD TO GREAT AND THE SOCIAL SECTORS; the enduring classic BUILT TO LAST, which explores how some leaders build companies that remain visionary for generations; HOW THE MIGHTY FALL, which delves into how once-great companies can self-destruct; and most recently, GREAT BY CHOICE, which is about thriving in chaos – why some do, and others don’t – and the leadership behaviors needed in a world beset by turbulence, disruption, uncertainty, and dramatic change.

Driven by a relentless curiosity, Jim began his research and teaching career on the faculty at Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he received the Distinguished Teaching Award in 1992. In 1995, he founded a management laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, where he conducts research and engages in Socratic dialogue with CEOs and senior leadership teams.

Jim holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematical sciences and an MBA from Stanford University, and honorary doctoral degrees from the University of Colorado and the Peter F. Drucker Graduate School of Management at Claremont Graduate University.

Photo credit: very-nice.info

Episode 216: Jim Collins – How To Go From Good To Great

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“You seem to focus a lot on the question, “How to be successful?” That is the wrong question. The right question is “How can I be useful?” — Peter Drucker sharing advice with Jim Collins

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence:
    • Never go to a meeting without writing down 5 questions prior to the meeting
    • Always follow up the meeting with at least a page of notes — Share those with your mentor
  • What made you say yes to The Learning Leader Show after 2 1/2 years?
    • It requires intense focus to prepare
    • This is a teaching moment
    • Only say yes if it’s going to be impactful. The team determined this show was the right place to do that
  • Always ask yourself — “How can I make myself useful to the world?”
    • This was advice originally given to him by Peter Drucker
  • A great teacher can change your life in 30 seconds — Peter Drucker did that for Jim
  • “I am constitutionally unemployable” — Why Jim feels this about himself
  • His curiosity has led to the success and most importantly… Great questions like:
    • How to turn something into an enduring great company?
    • How someone or a company can go from Good To Great?
  • Jim most admired Peter Drucker when he was 35 years old…
    • The story of their first meeting and how Peter was the curious one… Kept peppering Jim with questions to start the conversation (much like Jim did to me to start this conversation)
    • “The ultimate zen master with bamboo stick”
  • Drucker – “It seems to me that you spend a lot of time worrying if you will survive. You probably will survive. You seem to focus a lot on the question, “how to be successful?” That is the wrong question. The right question is “How to be useful?”
  • What would it have cost Jim to not publish Good To Great after he finished the manuscript? — More than $100m.  He had to get it out in the world.  He felt it was his responsibility to do so…
  • Another great mentor said to Jim… “When seeking an entrepreneurial path… Cut off all other options and GO.”
  • “Everything is driven by by questions”
  • Can a good company become a great company? How?
  • Level 5 Leader
    • Starts with confronting the brutal facts
    • Personal humility and professional will
    • Not what, but who — Get the right people on the bus
  • Does not happen in one fell swoop or a leap. It happens over time. Flywheel — Create momentum
  • Understand the hedgehog concept — An expert in one thing… Knows it very well
    • 3 Parts of the Hedgehog concept
      • Deeply passionate about it
      • Encoded for it… You’re really good at it. An expert
      • Economically, you can make money from it
  • Level 5 Leaders:
    • What cause do I serve?
    • Humility to serve… It’s not about them
    • Willful — Able to make difficult decisions
  • For the best Level 5 Leaders… How do they sustain it?
    • It’s easier for them because they understand their personal hedgehog — It helps them remain renewed after many years
  • “Measured Risk” vs. “Burn The Boats”
    • Fire Bullets… Then Cannon Balls
      • For Jim, this was his first two books + his time as a professor at Stanford before he decided to leave to start his own company
  • You must navigate your path.  It doesn’t mean you take unfounded risk… Fire bullets first, then cannonballs
    • “If you never fire a cannonball, you’ll never make it.”
  • “BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal)”
    • How to write a good one?
    • Take calibrated, calculated risk —
    • Have things to keep you alive even if everything goes wrong
      • Productive Paranoia
  • Validation – What are points of success you can look to?
    • Jim’s wife Joann committing to winning an Ironman race… She was a consultant at the time.  She was also a runner. She tried biking and was very good at it.  Eventually she practiced, took measured risks, and won the Ironman race
  • “If you were a trial attorney and had to win the case, what evidence would you use?”
  • The Flywheel principle and putting it to use for Jeff Bezos and the Amazon team — How could they build momentum? After Jim met with Jeff Bezos and his leadership team in 2001, Amazon executives were elated; according to several members of the team at the time, they felt that, after five years, they finally understood their own business.Most important for young leaders — Jim’s advice
  • “FIRST WHO, THEN WHAT?”
    • Who do you want to mentor you? Who do you want to mentor?
    • Who do you want to be your friends? Who do you want to work with? Who do you want to spend time with?
    • The most important question is WHO
    • You don’t need to answer WHAT until you answer WHO

“The most important question is WHO. First WHO, then WHAT. Who will be your mentor? Who will be your friends? Who will you help? Who will you spend time with? You don’t need to answer what until well after you’ve answered WHO.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 071: NateBoyer – Green Beret, Texas Football, The NFL

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Callaway Golf. We have partnered to give away The #1 selling Driver in 2017.  The Callaway GBB Epic Driver.  This club is valued at $499 and we are giving one away to a loyal listener of the show.  To enter the drawing: Tweet (or post on Instagram) a favorite leadership quote from an episode of The Learning Leader Show and tag/@ me on Twitter or Instagram.

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Episode 215: Chris Fussell — How To Build A Team of Teams (One Mission)

Episode 215: Chris Fussell — How To Build A Team of Teams (One Mission)

Chris Fussell is a Partner at the McChrystal Group Leadership Institute. He is the author of One Mission: How Leaders Build a Team of Teams, and a co-author of the New York Times bestseller Team of Teams, the first book in the series. He was commissioned as a Naval Officer in 1997 and spent the next 15 years on U.S. Navy SEAL Teams around the globe. He then served as Aide-de-Camp to Lieutenant General Stanley McChrystal during McChrystal’s final year commanding a Joint Special Operations Task Force fighting Al Qaeda around the globe. If you’d like to listen to the first conversation I had with Chris Fussell, CLICK HERE.

Since leaving active duty in 2012, Fussell has also served as a Senior Fellow for National Security at New America, sits on the Board of Directors for the Navy SEAL Foundation, is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and teaches at Yale University’s Jackson Institute.

Photo credit: The McChrystal Group

Episode 215: Chris Fussell — How To Build A Team of Teams (One Mission)

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“Remember, your position has little formal authority but massive reach. For many of the organizations we interact with, their entire opinion of our organization will be shaped off the tone of your emails, the courtesy you give their staff, and the respect you show for their Mission.” — General Stanley McChrystal speaking to Chris Fussell immediately following him becoming his Aide-De-Camp

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence:
    • A constant intellectual curiosity
  • The interview process to become General McChrystal’s Aide-De-Camp
    • A unique window to get that exposure
    • McChrystal trusted that if Chris wasn’t qualified, then he wouldn’t have been nominated
    • Career goals –> Family situation (could it handle Chris working 24/7 for a year? –> What would Chris enjoy about it?
    • What sealed Chris earning the job?  Chris being incredibly curious about wanting to fully understand how the organization runs at a high level.  General McChrystal loved that about Chris
  • “It was one of the hardest years of my career”
    • It was intense but the exposure was phenomenal
  • “If we’ve hit a point for 24 hours where we aren’t questioning something, or there is no friction, then something is wrong”
  • How to handle issues at UBER?
    • “The issue is putting too much on to 1 person. It’s not about 1 heroic leader. There needs to be a cultural shift.  They need to create a leadership culture.”
  • Operating Rhythm — John Heisman 1899: The hurry up offense.  Just because you have a 40 second play clock, doesn’t mean you have to use all of it.
    • Chris and team were on a 24 hour operating rhythm.  They re-synchronized every 24 hours.  Had to have a flexible approach to handle the enemy.
      • A sense of shaped consciousness
  • Chris Zook
    • An aversion to bureaucracy
    • Front line obsession
  • Transparency of communication model
    • Senior leaders remain in close contact with issues on the ground without having to put out all of the fires
      • Hybrid model layered into it –> Interconnected model
  • McChrystal’s advice to Chris when he first got the job: “Remember, your position has little formal authority but massive reach. For many of the organizations we interact with, their entire opinion of our organization will be shaped off the tone of your emails, the courtesy you give their staff, and the respect you show for their Mission.”
  • Chris’s career advice:
    • Don’t think about money/industry — Think what matters most to you? Lifestyle — Coaching little league or being a high level CEO?  Where do you want to be in 5 years? Where do you want to live? Do you want to raise a family? Important to map all of that out and build a profession around those goals.
    • Chris also teaches at Yale and does this exercise
      • Write a letter to yourself — What type of leader do you want to be in 5 years? Map out your goals

“It’s a cultural shift. A development of a leadership culture is needed.” — Chris Fussell discussing the changes he would make at UBER

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 071: NateBoyer – Green Beret, Texas Football, The NFL

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Callaway Golf. We have partnered to give away The #1 selling Driver in 2017.  The Callaway GBB Epic Driver.  This club is valued at $499 and we are giving one away to a loyal listener of the show.  To enter the drawing: Tweet (or post on Instagram) a favorite leadership quote from an episode of The Learning Leader Show and tag/@ me on Twitter or Instagram.

CONTINUE

Episode 214: Jason Calacanis – How To Turn $100,000 Into $100,000,000 (Angel Investing)

Episode 214: Jason Calacanis – How To Turn $100,000 Into $100,000,000 (Angel Investing)

Jason Calacanis is a technology entrepreneur and an angel investor. The founder of a series of conferences that bring entrepreneurs together with potentials investors, he was a scout for top-tier Silicon Valley venture capital firm Sequoia Capital and frequently appears in the media. He is the author of a new book, Angel: How To Invest In Technology Startups – Timeless Advice From An Angel Investor Who Turned $100,000 into $100,000,000.

Photo credit: Calacanis.com

Episode 214: Jason Calacanis – How To Turn $100,000 Into $100,000,000 (Angel Investing)

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“I don’t need to know if your product will succeed.  I need to know if you will succeed.”

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence/Key Traits in the greatest Founders
    • Craftsmanship — Making something, having attention to detail, understanding the why
    • Passion
    • Intentionality
    • Thoughtful – Do they know why they do what they do
  • As an investor, you need to ask short questions
    • “Small Mouth, Big Ears” — LISTEN. Let the founder talk
  • Are they a missionary or a mercenary? Need to know
    • Why are they doing this?
    • They need to understand that it is really hard
  • Self awareness is a must — Jason knows that he is a compulsive gambler. He has a risk taking approach. He likes having an edge.
    • But he also has “tilt control.” He knows when to lay down a big hand (poker speak for when you have a big hand but still know it’s not enough)
    • You need to know who you are and what you enjoy
  • “I love being the guy cutting a check for a founder that nobody else believes in”
    • “I win about once in every 40 investments. I was a poor kid from Brooklyn and now I’m extremely wealthy”
  • “I found a casino called Silicon Valley”
  • “There are a lot of really dumb people who are fabulously wealthy in Silicon Valley”
  • “Investing in this market is like being dealt the Ace of Spades”
  • Winning big poker hands against Daniel Negreanu and Phil Hellmuth
  • Jason covered Travis Kalanick while he was at Scour
  • When Travis showed him Uber, Jason immediately said, “Can I invest?”
  • Were some of the qualities that led to Travis and Uber’s success also what led to the problems?
    • He has a fighter mentality. That’s why he’s been so successful. It’s a fair question to ask if that’s what has led to these problems as well…
    • Sometimes you have to take a step back and analyze what’s happening
    • Getting from A to B, you need to fight.  Going from B to C, you need empathy
  • How do you get paid as an Angel Investor?
    • Go public — IPO
    • Secondary Shares — Company buys back shares from early investors (this happened for Jason with Facebook)
    • Company is bought — WhatsApp, Oculus, Instagram — Get cash/stock
  • Investing practices
    • How much of your bankroll do you put in play?
    • Build a network — Technology is the future
  • Ways that everyone can invest
    • Syndicates
    • Angel List
    • Seed Invest

“Elon is a good friend. He was broke. I asked how much the Model S cost. He said, “$50,000.” I wrote him two $50,000 checks and said, “I’ll take 2.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 071: NateBoyer – Green Beret, Texas Football, The NFL

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Callaway Golf. We have partnered to give away The #1 selling Driver in 2017.  The Callaway GBB Epic Driver.  This club is valued at $499 and we are giving one away to a loyal listener of the show.  To enter the drawing: Tweet (or post on Instagram) a favorite leadership quote from an episode of The Learning Leader Show and tag/@ me on Twitter or Instagram.

CONTINUE

Episode 213: Ryan Holiday – How To Make Work That Lasts (Perennial Seller)

Episode 213: Ryan Holiday – How To Make Work That Lasts (Perennial Seller)

This is Round 3 with best-selling author, entrepreneur, and renowned marketing strategist, Ryan Holiday. If you’d like to listen to our first conversation, go HERE.  If you’d like to check out the second one, go HERE. Brian Koppelman (screenwriter & director: Rounders, Ocean’s Thirteen and Billions) once said, “I don’t have many rules in life, but one I never break is: If Ryan Holiday writes a book, I read it as soon as I can get my hands on it.” I agree.  And I love every opportunity I have to speak with and learn from Ryan Holiday. I’m thankful that he sent me an advanced copy of his newest book, Perennial Seller. And if you care about making work that lasts, I urge you to read it.

Photo credit: New York Times

Episode 213: Ryan Holiday – How To Make Work That Lasts (Perennial Seller)

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“Give, Give, Give, Give… Build Karmic Debt.”

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence = Pete Carroll and Bill Belichick embracing Obstacle Is The Way and Ego Is The Enemy
  • How to build something that is “timeless”
    • When you build your home, are you thinking about how it will look in 10 years
    • When you cut your hair or wear an outfit, do you think about how it will look years later in pictures?
  • Why write Perennial Seller?
    • It’s important not to dive in until you have a path
    • Always think, “How do I make this last?”
    • “Literary greatness is 10 years or more”
    • “I have to follow my own advice”
  • Platform
    • How Kevin Hart built his platform (and email list) every night while on stage
    • People need to think about how they are building their platform long before they launch
    • Kevin Kelly — 1,000 true fans
    • Who are you launching to?
    • “Kevin Hart was knocked on his ass. He would go to cities where he didn’t have fans to build up his platform and email list. This was before he was famous.”
    • “People want to have a platform, but they don’t want to build a platform.”
      • You must build it through giving
      • Ryan Holiday built his email list to 81,000 by recommending books.  He recommended 1,000 books before he asked anyone to buy one of his.
  • “Give, Give, Give, Give… Build Karmic Debt.” — The world is not zero sum
  • The success of Eric Barker and his book Barking Up The Wrong Tree. He built his email list up to 300,000 people by blogging/writing regularly for years. He gave for free, provided value. His book sold many and became a best seller because he built his platform.
  • Jeff Bezos — “Focus on the things that do not change.” – Zoom in on something timeless.
  • “It starts by wanting to create a classic.” — Robert Greene
  • How do we avoid falling for the seduction of short term notability to focus on long term success?
    • The “Lindy Effect” — Nasim Taleb
  • The Obstacle Is The Way sold 3,000 books the first week, then steadily sold more. Now it sells about 1,000 a week.
  • “What are you making and who are you making it for?”
  • “Marketing is not separate, it’s part of the puzzle.”
  • Ryan discusses still receiving “hate” for Trust Me I’m Lying
  • Idea –> Execution. Casey Neistat “I don’t want to hear about your best idea. The idea is the easy part.”
  • Writing Routines — Why Ryan started studying the routines of other great writers
    • “You have to have a routine. You must treat this creative profession like a profession”
    • Being very descriptive with the work
  • Why being in great physical shape is “part of the job”
    • You should do some form of strenuous exercise every single day
    • Seinfeld — Chain method. Put an X on the calendar every day for exercise
    • Discipline: Doing it even when you don’t feel good. You have to get up and do it

“People want to have a platform, but they don’t want to build it.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 071: NateBoyer – Green Beret, Texas Football, The NFL

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Callaway Golf. We have partnered to give away The #1 selling Driver in 2017.  The Callaway GBB Epic Driver.  This club is valued at $499 and we are giving one away to a loyal listener of the show.  To enter the drawing: Tweet (or post on Instagram) a favorite leadership quote from an episode of The Learning Leader Show and tag/@ me on Twitter or Instagram.

CONTINUE