AuthorRyan Hawk

Episode 240: Todd Henry – Be The Leader That Creative People Need (Herding Tigers)

Episode 240: Todd Henry – Be The Leader That Creative People Need (Herding Tigers)

Todd Henry is the founder of Accidental Creative, a company that helps creative people and teams be prolific, brilliant and healthy. He regularly speaks and consults with companies about how to develop practices that lead to everyday brilliance. He is the author of four books (The Accidental Creative, Louder Than Words, Die Empty, Herding Tigers), speaks internationally on productivity, creativity, leadership and passion for work, and build tools for creative people and teams. In short, he’s an arms dealer for the creative revolution.  His latest book is called Herding Tigers: Leading talented, creative people requires a different skill set than the one many management books offer. As a consultant to creative companies, Todd Henry knows firsthand what prevents creative leaders from guiding their teams to success, and in Herding Tigers he provides a bold new blueprint to help you be the leader your team needs. Learn to lead by influence instead of control. Discover how to create a stable culture that empowers your team to take bold creative risks. And learn how to fight to protect the time, energy, and resources they need to do their best work.  

Episode 240: Todd Henry – Be The Leader That Creative People Need (Herding Tigers)

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The Learning Leader Show

“Great leaders have great rituals. Great leaders are connected. Great leaders have set questions they ask when they meet someone for the first time.”

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence =
    • Great leaders have great rituals
      • Disciplined time to study/reflect
      • Well read
      • Go on walks
    • Great leaders are connected to their network
    • Great leaders have set questions they ask someone when they meet for the first time
  • Todd’s rituals
    • Same breakfast everyday, same coffee mug everyday
    • 1 hour of study/read/time to think
    • Writes morning pages (3 full pages long hand)
  • Creating space for yourself
    • Predictable space, a buffer – “I have a ritual of taking a long walk in the middle of my day” — “It helps me get lost in thought”
  • Set questions to ask when you meet someone
    • “What’s the most important thing I should know about you?”
    • What’s inspiring you right now?”
  • Cover bands don’t change the world
    • Go out and present YOUR ideas to the market place
    • “If you want to have a voice in the market place, you have to have a voice” — You can’t just regurgitate what others say: Take what you learn, synthesize it with your own thoughts and have a voice, a point of view
      • “Your synthesis is what is valuable”
  • Writing The Accidental Creative was hard and lonely
  • Leading Creatives – We assume they get it… No, you must be clear that they do.  Walk them through your thought process, what you expect, why you expect it
  • Brian Koppelman (Creator of Billions) – Leading with influence vs being a micro-manager.  The director must own the show… They must have a compelling vision, point of view. Koppelman must create the space to give the director of each episode that ownership (he owns it all)
  • Creative people need two things
    • Stability – Protect them, give them the space they need, be clear
    • Challenge – Cannot allow boredom
    • These two exist is constant tension, push/pull.  You have to know how/when/why to turn the dial on each
    • “Your entire career, up until you’re a manager, you have complete control — As a manager you must shift from control to influence (it’s hard) or the team cannot scale beyond you
  • Your team must understand the WHY behind what you do — If not they just inherit tactics but don’t know why they do it.  It can’t scale without knowing the WHY
  • Need to make certain creative people feel ownership of the work
    • Influence is about principle
  • Why is implementation and execution so hard?
    • Leaders struggle with insecurity
      • “Your area of greatest insecurity can inflict the most damage to your organization… It’s about ego more than confidence”
  • Why write Herding Tigers?
    • “I wrote the book I wish I had… A lot of people don’t have the model of what great leadership is”
  • Here’s what it feels like right now:
    • Action
    • Pause
    • Reflection
    • Redirection
    • Action

“Cover bands don’t change the world.  Find your own voice.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

CONTINUE

Episode 239: Dan Pink – The Scientific Secrets Of Perfect Timing (When)

Episode 239: Dan Pink – The Scientific Secrets Of Perfect Timing (When)

Daniel Pink is the author of six provocative books — including his newest, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, to be published in January 2018. His other books include the long-running New York Times bestseller A Whole New Mind and the #1 New York Times bestsellers Drive and To Sell is Human. His books have won multiple awards and have been translated into 37 languages.  If you’d like to listen to the first time Dan joined me on The Learning Leader Show, CLICK HERE.

Dan’s TED Talk on the science of motivation is one of the 10 most-watched TED Talks of all time, with more than 19 million views. His RSA Animate video about the ideas in his book, Drive, has collected more than 14 million views.(from DanPink.com) (Photo Credit – HOW Design)

Episode 239: Dan Pink – The Scientific Secrets Of Perfect Timing (When)

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“It’s like brick laying.  I show up every day and I hit my word (count) goal.  Day after day after day.  Every day.”

Show Notes:

  • Dan’s book writing process:
    • “It’s like 1930’s football… One short play at a time.”
    • Brick laying, very laborious…
      • Get in office by 8:30 and hit the writing (word count) goal every single day… Day after day after day after day…
      • Write 700 words a day, every day
        • “I show up and hit my number, every single day”
    • Combining research with interesting stories — work in chunks, have research in a Word doc, and the book in a separate doc. Review, go back and forth
    • Go through the (printed out) research, highlight, underline, review a lot
    • If you do this every day, it adds up
  • Why write about this topic? The topic of When
    • As a writer, you must pick a topic you are VERY interested in… You spend years on the project (research, writing, speeches)
    • “I wrote this book because I wanted to read it”
  • How to know if an idea is worth exploring?
    • “You don’t… But when you share it with others, does it create curiosity in them?  Do they ask follow up questions?  If they do, you may be on to something”
  • The 3 stages of our days
    • Peak – Analytical work, smart
    • Trough – The afternoon “Bermuda Triangle” — A bad time to make decisions
    • Recovery – A creative time
  • Why lunch is the most important meal of the day — This is a time where you need to leave what you’re doing, go outside, go with a friend, disconnect from work, don’t look at your phone, need to recharge
  • Breaks are enormously important – Social breaks (with friends) are better than solo breaks
  • Napping for 20 minutes in the afternoon is very helpful
    • Drink a cup of coffee, set you iPhone for an alarm to go off in 23 minutes, lay down with an eye mask.  If you fall asleep in 5 minutes, you get an 18 minute nap, and you wake up and the caffeine starts to kick in
  • Why NBA players who get more “touches” have more success than others… Scientific evidence supports this
  • The importance of endings… How we end things:
    • Energize – More 29, 39, 49 year olds run marathons than any other age.  People want to end on a high note
    • Encode – Evaluate and record experiences – How something ends is very important. Look at Yelp reviews — People remember the experience for how a meal ended more than anything else
    • Elevate – People prefer rising sequences. Dan’s favorite tip:  When sharing good news and bad news, always START with the bad news, and end with the good news
  • We are very intentional about who, what, why… why aren’t we intentional about WHEN?  We should be…

“We are very intentional about who, what, and why.  We aren’t intentional about WHEN.  We should be.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

CONTINUE

Episode 238: Neil Pasricha – Why Action Creates Motivation: 1,000 Awesome Things

Episode 238: Neil Pasricha – Why Action Creates Motivation: 1,000 Awesome Things

Neil Pasricha is the New York Times-bestselling author of The Happiness Equation and The Book of Awesome series, which has been published in ten countries, spent over five years on bestseller lists, and sold over a million copies. Neil is a Harvard MBA, one of the most popular TED speakers of all time, and after ten years heading Leadership Development at Walmart he now serves as Director of The Institute for Global Happiness. He has dedicated the past fifteen years of his life to developing leaders, creating global programs inside the world’s largest companies and speaking to hundreds of thousands of people around the globe.

Episode 238: Neil Pasricha – Why Action Creates Motivation: 1,000 Awesome Things

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“Most think motivation leads to action… No, motivation doesn’t cause action… Action creates motivation.”

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • C — Clarity – Clear, succinct, memorable
    • O — Optimism — “Find the good in everything”
    • P — Patience — Delaying decision making until the last possible moment
      • The quality can improve if “we let the tension live”
  • Empower others – “Parkinson’s Law” – Work rises to the time needed to complete it.
  • “I don’t want to fight the customer.”  — Thinking about everything from their perspective. Wal-Mart
  • Being a Harvard Business School graduate
    • “Chase the companies that don’t come to Harvard to recruit.  You’ll learn more.” — Why Neil went to Wal-Mart
  • Neil’s 30 second pitch to why someone should hire him for a leadership role when he was very young
  • “I had to be artificially confident”
    • His pitch — 3 quick questions
      • Do you value internal promotions?
      • What’s the #1 program you’ve seen?
      • Would you be interested in topics of developing leaders at Harvard?
        • Get their email address and follow up
  • None of the companies were hiring when he was leaving school… Neil had to “create a job” within companies to get hired
  • Brene Brown – “If you go through life trying to find confirmation you don’t belong, you’ll find it.”
  • 2008 – The world was falling apart, his marriage ended, his best friend committed suicide..
    • He started the blog, 1,000 Awesome Things
    • Won a webby award for best blog in the world
    • Wrote The Book Of Awesome
  • He moved to NYC… Didn’t know anyone, lived alone
  • He was going through pain while starting the awesome things blog.  Focused on three things:
    • Make the blog public – hold him accountable
    • Use a countdown – From 1,000 to 1 — Helped him know it was going to end at some point
    • Finite – There is light at the end of the tunnel
  • “Most think motivation leads to action. Not true. Action creates motivation.”
  • The importance of consistency – Neil’s idea was not unique, but doing it everyday made him different from most
    • “Try to be receptive of other people’s ideas” — Helps you “notice things”
  • “Your questions are fantastic.  I’m not surprised.”
  • Working on deadlines — Neil wrote for a newspaper for four years.  Helped with this skill
  • “I believe in consistency”
  • Actionable advice: You have three, 56 hour buckets of your week.  They are:
    • 56 Hours – Sleep
    • 56 Hours – Work/Job
    • 56 Hours – What are you spending this time on? You can do whatever you want…
  • The happiness equation – Work/Life balance fulcrum — Flywheel
  • Taking his side hustle and making it his full time job — “I should have done it sooner.”

“If you go through life trying to find confirmation that you don’t belong, you’ll find it.” — Brene Brown

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

CONTINUE

Episode 237: AJ Jacobs – The Power of Irrational Confidence (Life As An Experiment)

Episode 237: AJ Jacobs – The Power of Irrational Confidence (Life As An Experiment)

A.J. Jacobs is an author, journalist, lecturer and human guinea pig. He has written four New York Times bestsellers that combine memoir, science, humor and a dash of self-help.  He is also editor at large at Esquire magazine, a commentator on NPR and a columnist for Mental Floss magazine. He is currently helping to build a family tree of the entire world and holding the biggest family reunion ever in 2015.

In addition to his books, Jacobs written for The New York TimesEntertainment Weekly, and New York magazine.

He has appeared on OprahThe Today ShowGood Morning America, CNN, The Dr. Oz Show, Conan and The Colbert Report.  He has given several TED talks, including ones about living biblically, creating a one-world family, and living healthily.

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Mizzen+Main.  To receive $50 OFF (when you buy 3 shirts), use the code RYANHAWK50 at checkout.

Episode 237: AJ Jacobs – The Power of Irrational Confidence (Life As An Experiment)

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“It’s easier to act your way into a new way of thinking, than think your way into a new way of acting.”

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Self delusion — Optimism helps you do incredible things.  Acting “as if”
      • “It’s easier to act your way into a new way of thinking, than think your way into a new way of acting.”
    • Great curiosity — “I’m curious about everything… Even things that don’t interest me.”
  • Why he read the entire Encyclopedia Britannica
  • Why the “good ole days” actually sucked — Studying this made him very grateful for being alive today
  • The practice of radical honesty and how it got him in trouble — He was forced to tell the full truth at all times
    • Can be good or bad
  • Gratitude — Common among the greatest achievers — be thankful for everything. “When you’re grateful for something as small as the elevator door opening, you’re much happier.”
  • It’s All Relative — Building a world family true.  How we are related.  How he is related to President Barack Obama…
    • It helps with perspective and tolerance… We’re more tolerant of people we are related to
    • The Global Family Reunion event
  • Why his experiments drive his wife crazy — The year of living biblically — Why it was so hard to follow the exact words of the Bible
  • Harvard studies — If we share DNA, people are more open to help one another
  • Why we need to get out of the echo chamber
  • Typical day — stretch, treadmill desk, write and walk at the same time, walking keeps him alert
    • Importance of “walks with wife” — raises serotonin
  • Batching activities — Phone calls
    • It’s lonely as a writer… AJ needs to speak with other creatives often: “I need to bounce ideas of of others in between the alone time”
    • Doing “Skype” lunches.  He eats lunch with friends over Skype
  • Best advice he’s heard: From George Clooney — “When I get up to bat, I don’t think Am I going to hit a home run? I think, where will I hit this home run?” — The importance of irrational confidence.  Delusional optimism is helpful.
  • Stage presence (when speaking) — Why you “owe it to the audience” to think “you’re the baddest dude on the planet” and will deliver for THEM

“When I got up to bat, I didn’t think, “Am I going to hit a home run?” I thought, “Where will this home run go?” — George Clooney on the importance of self confidence

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

CONTINUE

Episode 236: Brian Scudamore – CEO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK: How To Scale A Business

Episode 236: Brian Scudamore – CEO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK: How To Scale A Business

Brian started his business in Vancouver, Canada at the age of 18, and later went on to franchise 1-800-GOT-JUNK? as a way to expand operations. Today, 1-800-GOT-JUNK? has 1000 trucks on the road throughout some 180 locations in Canada, the United States, and Australia.

Brian has received wide recognition in the media and business community. 1-800-GOT-JUNK? has celebrated appearances on the highly-acclaimed Undercover Boss Canada, Dr. Oz, Dr. Phil, CNN, ABC Nightline, the Today Show, The Hour with George Stroumboulopoulos, and the View. His story has been told in Fortune Magazine, Business Week, New York Times, Huffington Post, and Wall Street Journal, to name a few. 1-800-GOT-JUNK? is currently the starring junk removal attraction on the hit A&E reality show, Hoarders.

Brian has brought his entrepreneurial success story to many conference stages, including the Fortune Small Business Magazine’s national conference. A strong believer in personal and professional development, Brian graduated from MIT’s four-year Birthing of Giants program, and has subsequently completed several years of MIT’s BOG’s alumni program, Gathering of Titans. He is also a participant in a nine-year executive education program at Harvard University through YPO Presidents’ University. (from 1800gotjunk.com)

Episode 236: Brian Scudamore – CEO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK: How To Scale A Business

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“I don’t know if you can live the full potential if it’s a side hustle. You need to give maximum effort.”

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Focus – All in, not a side hustle
    • Faith – Belief in self, clear vision
    • Effort – Discipline
  • Why we all need an “MBA” — A “Mentor Board of Advisors”
  • Fred DeLuca — Subway founder – He never took his eye off the prize. He struggled and kept going. 32 stores in 12 years.
  • Are entrepreneurs born or made?
    • Brian started a carwash as a kid.  He sold candy in his dorm room
  • Creativity as a Dad — Always build things with your kids and watch them grow together (ie. a garden)
  • Why did he start 1-800-GOT-JUNK?
    • Needed money for college… Initially called it “The Rubbish Boys”
  • Brian learned more about running a business from actually doing it than he did in school
  • The amazing story of Brian’s dad “falling out of his chair” when he told me he was leaving school to run the business full time
    • “It couldn’t be a side hustle.”  The need for maximum effort to be successful
  • How Brian views opportunities
    • And where he thinks of new ideas to create more businesses
  • The importance of going on walks
  • Meeting outdoors in Vancouver — “Get your muscles moving”
  • Morning routine — Get up at 5:55
    • Power hour
    • Focus on self
    • Exercise
    • Study French, Italian (other languages)
    • Spend moments learning before the kids wake up
  • Side hustle — “I don’t know if you can live the full potential if it’s a side hustle. You need to give it full effort. Imagine the possibility if they quit their job”
  • Philosophy on sales? Mentor Jack Daly — “Ask questions and listen”
  • How he got his first 100 customers
  • “I have the best job in the world for me”
  • Brian’s hiring process
  • Why he fired his entire team of 11 at one point — They didn’t have the right attitude
  • “Everyone must pass the beer and bbq test” — “You have to want to have a beer and eat bbq with them”
    • “I want friendly, ambitious, passionate, optimistic people.”
    • “Hire for attitude, train for skill”
    • Brian is the “culture” interviewer
  • Cameron Herold — Best man in his wedding, previous business partner.  Brian shares why he had to fire him. “You cannot have 2 “fire, ready, aim” type of people.”
  • The process of making mistakes on his path to hiring the right team
  • The need for Erik Church as the COO — He is an executor.  They are a great yin and yang
    • Take a sheet of paper and write down what you enjoy doing and what you’re good at.  Also write what you don’t like doing and you’re bad it.  Find the person to fill those gaps.  Erik does that for Brian
    • How to handle disagreements?
  • Birthing of giants – MIT — Annual learning, monthly call
  • The importance of being a lifelong learner, be curious, ask questions
  • Book to read, The E-Myth by Michael Gerber

“I hire friendly, ambitious, passionate, optimistic people. Hire for attitude, train for skill.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

CONTINUE