AuthorRyan Hawk

Episode #266: Ryan Caldbeck – CircleUp CEO: How To Build The Framework Of Your Life & Career

Episode #266: Ryan Caldbeck – CircleUp CEO: How To Build The Framework Of Your Life & Career

Ryan Caldbeck is the founder of San Francisco-based CircleUp, which provides an online investing marketplace that supports direct equity investments from individual investors into privately held consumer and retail companies.  He went to Duke for his undergraduate degree and earned his MBA from Stanford.  He is widely known for his thoughtful “tweetstorms” on a varying degree of topics including… “For all the CEO’s who are crushing it, here are the mistakes I’ve made…” “How to hire the right people…” “Micromanaging…” And so much more. He’s one of the most thoughtful and thought provoking people I’ve spoken to…

We are hosting a workshop on developing YOUR personal excellence as a leader.  For details and availability, go to RyanHawk.me 

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“What we look for in a person: Horsepower, Integrity, Work Ethic, Teamwork, Pride.”

Show Notes:

  • Sustaining excellence:
    • Persistence – regardless of skill, willing to run through unlimited doors with no light at the end of the tunnel. It can be soul crushing
    • Identified focus passion – an understanding of the passion that is identifiable.
    • Drive – A motor. Really good at email and/or communication. Can’t take too long. “Have a motor.” Always moving
    • Values – “I don’t say that lightly.” You can’t sustain excellence without values. “A framework to understand you.”
  • Isn’t it hard to know what your passion is? “Yes. I got scared about the treadmill that I saw others get on.”  However, people don’t think they can leave the corporate job that pays well.  But you can.  Begin by thinking about the framework to make it happen.
  • “Silicon Valley is a hard town to talk about challenges.”
  • What it’s like to lead 60 employees
  • What mistakes were made in the hiring process?
    • “We took too long to make frameworks.”
    • “Frameworks show others what to do.”
  • What traits/values do you look for in hiring?
    • “The airport test doesn’t make sense to me. I don’t have to want to spend a day around them in the airport.”
    • “We have crystallized what we look for in a person.”
      • Horsepower – intelligence over experience
      • Integrity – don’t talk negatively about others
      • Work ethic – must be willing to work hard
      • Teamwork – need to work well with others
      • Pride – Care
  • How to gauge work ethic in a job interview?
    • “It starts with everyone knowing we are looking for that.”
  • Advice for the individual contributor making the leap to manager…
    • “Figure out framework for your specific role. Get clarity on what each person’s role is.”
    • “Learn how to develop empathy for what your team goes through. Sit with them without micromanaging them.”
    • “Make sure you have a resource (person) to talk to about being a manager. Hire a coach. Get a peer group outside of your company.”
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea
  • Ryan has a coach and a group of 12 CEO’s that he meets with regularly
  • Building culture:
    • Focus on your mission
      • “To help entrepreneurs thrive by giving them the capital and resources they need.”
  • Their Values:
    • Do it right
    • Be brave
    • Be a solution
  • Constantly reinforce the vision
  • Most useful advice:
    • Winston Churchill – “Never give up.”
    • “Do what you’re passionate about”
  • How to have balance at home?
    • Two kids and his wife is a senior leader at her company
    • Mediation after the kids go to bed
    • Online working from 8:30-10:00
    • Spend time with spouse only
  • Use the “Get To Know You Document

“If you don’t keep growing, you will become irrelevant.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 234: Jocko Willink — Why Discipline Equals Freedom

CONTINUE

Episode #265: Clay Mathile – Self Made Billionaire Shares His Keys To Success

Episode #265: Clay Mathile – Self Made Billionaire Shares His Keys To Success

Former CEO and owner of The Iams Company, Clay is the founder and Chairman of the Board of Aileron. He believes strongly in free enterprise and has a high respect for business owners who risk their capital to employ others. Clay attributes professional management as one of the key reasons he was able to grow Iams to a $1 billion organization. In 1999, the Mathile family sold Iams to international conglomerate Procter & Gamble for the sum of $2.3 billion.  Clay graciously invited our Brixey & Meyer team to his office at Aileron to record this episode.

We are hosting a workshop on developing YOUR personal excellence as a leader.  For details and availability, go to RyanHawk.me 

You can watch this episode!

The Learning Leader Show – Video of this conversation:

“I bought the business with borrowed money. I was scared to death. I didn’t know how to run a business.  I had to learn.” — Clay Mathile describes his feelings after buying Iams

Show Notes:

  • Sustaining excellence:
    • Vision of what they want to do and where they want to go
    • A good idea of how to get there
    • Committed to their vision and idea
    • Clay’s 4 things he wanted
      • Own his own business
      • Have that business be something that was excellent and stood for something
      • To help entrepreneurs grow
      • To use technology learned to help develop food for indigenous people
  • Was hired at Iams in 1970 as the 7th employee
    • It took five years to figure out the problems and five more years to fix it
    • Convinced Paul Iams to sell Iams to him in 1975 (half) and the rest in 1981
    • Borrowed money to buy it
    • Why Clay?  “Paul had seen me work and seen me make an impact on the business.  I spent a lot of time on the sales and marketing strategy.”
      • Focused on the breeders and vets. The people who influence the actual user.  Clay was ahead of his time.
  • Went to President’s Course in 1982 at American Management Association
    • “I’m scared to death, I don’t know how to run a business.  I needed to learn.”
    • The key was hiring a President and super charging their growth
    • What went in the decision to sell the company?
      • Sat down with his family to decide what each child wanted to do – “They all wanted to chase their own dreams, their own passions. They didn’t want to own Iams.”
    • The CEO of Procter & Gamble called…
      • Clay takes us inside the room to negotiate the deal: “We told them what our number was… And they exceeded it. It ended up with $2.3 billion.”
  • Starting the family office in anticipation of the sale of his business — To build a new organization for the future.
  • Aileron started as the center for entrepreneur organizations in 1994
  • Aileron – “We give lift and guidance to the business owner.”
  • “How can I possibly repay you?” — Clay said to his mentors.  They said, “Don’t pay me… Just pass it on to others.”
  • “People are looking for immediate help for a problem they are having right now.  And we’ve designed this place to help them solve those problems.”
  • Been married for 55 years, have raised a successful family… How?
    • “When I was home, I was home. I was present. I wasn’t playing golf or out with the boys.”
    • Keys: “Trust… You have to like the person too.  Like hanging out with them.”
  • Why everyone should have a board?
    • “They see things that you don’t see. A strategic overview. It’s something you can’t do yourself.”
    • “After you’ve been in business for 10 years, 75% of all problems are because of you.”
  • Having a “Personal Board of Advisors”
    • “I recommend all senior executives have mentors.  All you have to do is ask. I’ve never had anyone turn me down when I’ve asked them.”
    • “Build trust and mutual respect.”
  • Culture
    • “I built it so I could work in it.”
    • “I had strange things in my management style. I was promoting empowerment before it was popular.”
    • “Most people do the right things for the right reasons if you put them in the right environment.”
    • “The value of the individual is so important. Treat them with respect.  They feel important and special. I saw every single employee at least once per year all over the world.”
    • “People are inherently good.”
  • Bad leaders = “Big egos, not trusting of others, insecure people.”
  • “When you push people outside of their comfort zone, you can’t beat on them when they fail. You have to let them make mistakes.”
  • Individual contributor to manager jump… Advice:
    • “You have to accept the fact that management is a profession as anything else is a profession.”
    • “Just because you’re the best sales person doesn’t mean you’ll be the best sales person.”
  • “As a manager, you’re job is to develop others.”
  • “You need to manage spontaneity, responsiveness.  Don’t react, be proactive.”
  • A good example of a proactive leader is a fire chief: They analyze the situation prior to making decisions. Manage in crisis
  • “In 1984, we built Iams University to help people learn…”
  • Most passionate about? “Teaching people, focus on the dreams of the people.  Read the book Dream Manager. That’s what we’re all about.”
  • Example of a typical day: “I do about anything I want to do.”
  • One dream for Aileron — “It will survive forever.”
  • Learning Leader = You have to be a continuous learner
  • How much of his success is luck?
    • “60% luck. Be in the right place at the right time.”
  • “Your listeners need to think about passing it on. To help others.”
  • Use the “Get To Know You Document

“We give lift and guidance to the business owner.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 234: Jocko Willink — Why Discipline Equals Freedom

CONTINUE

Episode #264: Liv Boeree – The Three Life Lessons From The Poker Table

Episode #264: Liv Boeree – The Three Life Lessons From The Poker Table

Liv Boeree is a poker player, television presenter and speaker. She is a World Series of Poker and 2010 European Poker Tour champion, and is the only female player in history to hold both titles. Born in Kent, Boeree studied at Ashford School before going on to earn a First Class Honours degree in Physics with Astrophysics at the University of Manchester. Liv is a three time winner of the Global Poker Index European Female Player of the year and currently sits at #5 on the female all-time live poker winnings list.

We are hosting a workshop on developing YOUR personal excellence as a leader.  For details and availability, go to RyanHawk.me 

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“Our instincts are built off our life experiences.”

Show Notes:

  • Sustaining excellence:
    • Humility to continue question themselves
    • Growth mindset
    • Confidence
    • Curiosity to try new things
  • “My hyper competitive mindset propelled me to do well in school… Even though I wasn’t as naturally smart as others.  I had to work at it.”
  • There are two people that exist in the world: Those who are humble and those who are about to be humbled.
  • Why poker?
    • “I wanted to be a musician and a rock star, but I wasn’t good enough.  Poker was even better.  I’m able to play a great game and travel the world.”
  • The mental framework of Poker: The foundation:
    • Rational decision making
    • Communication skill
    • Read LessWrong.com
  • How does poker thinking apply to life?
    • “Our instincts are built off our life experiences” — The Jesse Itzler model for decision making (trust your gut) vs the analytical approach… They are more similar than you think
  • How can you tell when someone is bluffing? (lying)
    • “It’s rare that people have physical tells
    • Most of the time it’s based on the math and your knowledge of how that person has played in the past (you see what they have played)
  • How poker relates to the interview process… How can you spot when someone isn’t telling the truth in a job interview?
    • “Ask them to re-tell their career story… But this time do it backwards” — It’s hard to do this unless you are telling the truth
    • Look for baseline behaviors when you meet someone and they don’t feel like they are in the “interview process” yet
      • Walking in from their car, checking in, going to happy hour, dinner
    • Thoughtfulness — Are they willing to admit a mistake
  • Three life lessons from the poker table:
    • Quantifying – Increase granularity in thinking. Willingness to work in uncertainty. What action will achieve the best response?
    • Intuition can be great with lots of data, but it’s not magic
    • Don’t let a run of good luck make you think you’re good
      • But how can you know the difference? — Find a great set of peers who will tell you the truth
  • Advice to an amateur player in the World Series main event of poker
    • Recognize the other players at the table. Who is great? Who isn’t? Watch closely when you are not in the hands to see the showdown value and gain information.  Balance your play based on who is in the hand with you
  • Read WaitButWhy.com from Tim Urban
  • Use the “Get To Know You Document

“If you don’t keep growing, you will become irrelevant.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 234: Jocko Willink — Why Discipline Equals Freedom

CONTINUE

Episode #263: Charlie McMahan – How To Build A Tribe From 50 To 5,000

Episode #263: Charlie McMahan – How To Build A Tribe From 50 To 5,000

Charlie McMahan has been the Lead Pastor of SouthBrook Church since 1992. He is focused on developing future leaders and spends many hours a week mentoring others (including me).

Charlie has led SouthBrook from a small church that originally met in an elementary school to now hosting more than 5,000 members per weekend.  He has a deep understanding for how to build a loyal tribe of people.

We recorded this in front of my teammates at Brixey & Meyer.  You can watch it here:

We are hosting a workshop on developing YOUR personal excellence as a leader.  For details and availability, go to RyanHawk.me 

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

“The Process: Teaser, Tension, Truth, Take Home, Together.”

Show Notes:

  • Sustaining excellence:
    • Integrated people – They aren’t chasing a bunch of different things
    • Consolidated on the self mission
    • Focused – Not distracted
  • Family
    • Charlie’s dad was gone 25 days a month (he later found out he was in the CIA)
    • The reason he turns down big opportunities is because he doesn’t want to travel and wants to be with his family
    • Levels of communication with kids
      • Don’t spend money on stuff, spend money on experiences — Their place is Hilton Head
  • Process for Charlie’s performances (his speeches/sermons)
    • The word entertainment means “To hold people’s attention”
  • The Process:
    • Teaser – Something that grabs you
    • Tension – The inductive part of speaking that you have to do today. So the listeners know “this is important.” If you don’t do this, people will leave
    • Truth
    • Take Home – The practical “do”
    • Together – “Isn’t this the kind of person we want to be?”
  • Most preachers were trained to be deductive… You can’t do that now. You need to help them draw their own conclusions.
  • Finding a way to weave stories and science together
  • The Medici Effect – The renaissance happened because seemingly disconnected entities were connected.
  • “I’m always figuring out how disconnected entities connect”
  • “The upside of stress”
    • “Emotions are like waves. You can’t choose which ones come, but you can choose which to ride.”
    • Choose to embrace stress, it can have a positive impact on you
  • Create a habit of how you look at life:
    • How long did it take you to put this message together? “30 hours and a lifetime.”
  • The intersection of the reality of the struggles with Charlie’s kids and applying it to the lives of the people you serve
  • What is it like to be the children of someone as successful as Charlie?
    • “Our kids had so much pressure on them.  We didn’t appreciate how much it was.”
      • “The Famous Father Syndrome” – Kids choose to differentiate from their parents because they can’t win that game
    • Advice give to parents:
      • “When you walk in the room, the temperature will go up for them.  Kids need stress to grow.”
      • “The stress free life is the dying life”
      • “When we walked in the room, the temperature went way up for my kids. The same heat that drove me, burned them.” –> “Most parenting things you learn 5 minutes too late”
      • PLAY – Personality type, Learning style, Ability level, Yes factor — “You don’t have to cave under the pressure. It doesn’t have to destroy you”
  • Growing a church from 50 people to 5,000 per weekend.  How?
    • Has to be a commitment to excellence that is YOU — Has to be in ALL areas of your life. “Excellence is a habit.”
      • “Excellence is expressing my worth… Ennobling others because I care. Perfectionism is trying to earn my worth by being perfect… And that is dangerous.”  Be careful to not think, “I have to be perfect or I”m not worth anything.”
      • “Maturity is way underrated”
      • “Excellence comes out of peace. In excellence the process is as much of importance as the product.”
      • “I don’t have grammatical errors on the manuscript that nobody else ever sees.”
      • “Excellence is the right people doing the right things for the right reasons.”
      • “The right motivations are not so compulsive.”
      • “The constant burden of leadership is the constant interception of entropy.”
        • “There is constant gravitational pull to become like everyone else.”
      • “Our church is for someone who doesn’t like church.” Why? “Because I didn’t like church.”
      • How do you handle the immense value of YOU as the leader? And the success moving forward without you?
        • “We’re constantly in process of finding the next leader.”  “When you’ve been some place a long time, you become in the way.”
          • Level 5 leader helps a place be better after they are gone
  • How to build a tribe?
    • Max DuPree – What are your unique tribal speaks?
      • The 5 S’s of SouthBrook:
        • Solitude, Scripture, Service, Support, Significant Events
    • A Tribe is where story and strategy meet.”
  • What is it like the minute before you go on stage?
    • “I used to panic. It took me 10 years to get over the “what am I doing!?”
    • “Leading is so presumptuous.”
    • “I’ve never stepped behind a microphone where I didn’t believe that I could save people’s lives. I truly believe every word I’m saying.”
    • “I can’t wait to share this.”
    • “I didn’t think about public speaking until I had to give a three minute speech my junior year in college.  Something happened at that speech. People leaned in.”
    • “Hitting the 10,000 hour mark has helped me. It’s easier to prepare.  I’m a huge believer in putting in the time.”
  • Charlie writes 3,500 words per week. Then put on the iPad and have it while on stage… “I memorize that by Friday.”
  • “I’m a master at self condemnation.”
  • Why be so critical of yourself?
    • “It can be a safety mechanism. If we self criticize, we won’t get as much criticism. And it does connect with people.”
  • Developing future leaders
    • “The test of leadership is the ability to reproduce yourself in others… The good parts of yourself that should be reproduced.”
    • “The path from direction to delegation”
    • “If I don’t succeed in succession, then I will have failed.”
    • “You can’t be a farmer, you have to be a rancher who raises up other farmers.”
  • Ron Howard and Sam Jones — Why Wall Street leaders hire former athletes?
    • “We like to hire athletes because they lose so much. They are forced to respond to failure.”
  • “I lose every day. I’m not good at having an accurate understanding of myself. I need people around me.”
  • “I was a world class (basketball) shooter. I shot 96% from the free throw line.”
  • Charlie was national player of the year.
  • “Grit is the only talent.  Those tough moments are the character builders.”
  • Charlie’s biggest challenge today? — “Figuring out a way to build a succession plan and not leave too soon. I live in that tension everyday.”
  • The importance of hobbies
  • How does it take a toll on your when you can’t please everybody?
    • “Leadership is the art of disappointing people at a rate they can handle.  You cannot sustain trying to please everyone. “
  • The importance of continued growth and having an apprentice
    • PB&J
      • Have to have people ahead of you, stretch you, challenge you
      • Need people alongside you, your peers, in it together, consolidate over shared stories
      • We grow most when we have people to teach. To pour in to…
  • “Writing makes a person exact. If it’s hazy in the podium, it will be foggy in the chair.”
  • “If you can’t listen, you can’t lead.”
  • “There is no other leader than The Learning Leader.”
  • Use the “Get To Know You Document

“If you don’t keep growing, you will become irrelevant.”

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 234: Jocko Willink — Why Discipline Equals Freedom

CONTINUE

Episode #262: Keith Yamashita – The Keys To Great Execution (Oprah, Starbucks, Steve Jobs)

Episode #262: Keith Yamashita – The Keys To Great Execution (Oprah, Starbucks, Steve Jobs)

Keith Yamashita  has led SYPartners for the past two decades, a practice that collaborates with CEOs and their leadership teams to build great companies and organizations. He’s worked with leaders at Apple, eBay, IBM, General Electric, Johnson & Johnson, Facebook, Nike, Starbucks, and Target Corporation, among others. SYPartners has been recognized by The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, and Fortune for its unique, human-centered approach, applied to both business and social challenges.

Earlier in Keith’s career, he was the chief writer for Steve Jobs.

Keith is a frequent writer on the topics of innovation, culture change, transformation, design. Keith has published in the Harvard Business Review, penned a popular business book called Unstuck, lectured at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford, The Yale School of Management, and the Jack Welch Leadership Center in Crotonville.

Episode #262: Keith Yamashita – The 3 Keys To Great Execution

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

Action Step – “Build a daily contemplative practice to create mind-fitness.”

Show Notes:

  • Sustaining excellence:
    • The ability to envision a future that doesn’t currently exist — Make it a reality
    • Optimistic
    • Creative
    • A diverse background
    • Authentic communicator
    • Daring and bold
  • People Keith has worked with who have sustained excellence:
    • Oprah Winfrey – magnetic personality, she can envision the future we want. She constantly re imagines herself. She has a strong creative core. She has a sense of deep creativity.
    • Howard Schultz – He’s always restless, reinvents regularly. He’s earned 9,000% return on investors money
  • How do you respond when Oprah calls you for help?
    • “We are always on the outer edge of incompetence.  We take on projects that we don’t know the answer to.  And then figure it out.  We respond to those calls with deep humility.”
  • Why choose Keith and SYPartners?
    • “If a leader wants to try something new… We help them experiment.”
  • Starbucks:
    • Closed 8,000 stores for racial bias training.
    • Keith and team helped them build new habits
  • SYPartners origin story:
    • “Our goal has never been to be famous, our goal is to be impactful”
    • 25 years ago with “three partners and $912 in my checking account”
    • Started as a communications firm –> Strategy –> Innovation –> Culture –> Transformation
    • There are 200 employees now
    • “We fight for greatness. We help leaders choose a more daring path”
    • “Everything is set with intentions” –> “Set your intentions and be very open to the universe”
  • How do you respond to skeptics?
    • “When I started I had $912 in my checking account.  I had to borrow money for rent.”
    • Only you know what’s inside of you.  “Your skepticism needs to be inward, not outward.”
    • “If greatness is your choice, it’s not made in big leaps, it’s made in daily focus.”
      • “Micro actions add up”
  • How to make the leap from individual contributor to manager?
    • Leadfully.com has been helpful
  • What was it like working for Steve Jobs?
    • “I showed up with writing samples. He said they were awful. He was testing me to see if I believed in my work.  It was the worst interview of my life… However, I got the job.”
    • “He’s the toughest boss I ever had.  But I learned more from him than anyone I’ve worked for.”
    • Steve was gifted in seeing what people were capable of and he was willing to push. He knew how to motivate you to your capacity
    • The danger in mimicking Steve’s behavior? “People try to mimic the behavior, but they don’t have his intentions.” Mimicking the behavior without the intentions is a recipe for disaster.
  • Execution and implementation:
    • Mind-fitness – Creativity in moments that matter. Be connected to others in a calm way. Ideas are just ideas. “You can train your mind to be present in this moment.”  Don’t judge others. “Build a daily contemplative process.”
    • Build a daily creative practice – Read, write, take notes, be awake, alive, aware. Get a folder, cut out articles, pictures. Create inspiration.  Recall past events.
    • Understand what moment you’re in – What’s happening? Develop keen awareness to the moments
  • Why books are the greatest investment ever (my thoughts)
  • Use the “Get To Know You Document

“We are always on the outer edge of incompetence.  We take on projects that we don’t know the answer to.  And then figure it out.  We respond to those calls with deep humility.” — How Keith responds when Oprah calls

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins — How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence – The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 234: Jocko Willink — Why Discipline Equals Freedom

CONTINUE